Musicians will now be able to monetize their performances with Facebook Live

Musicians will now be able to monetize their performances with Facebook Live

Musicians will now be able to monetize their performances with Facebook Live.

Facebook Live Performing Musicians now can monetize their music on FB.

Facebook Live Performing Musicians now can monetize their music on FB.

Page owners can now create an online event, set a price, promote the event, collect payments, and host the event – all in one place.

This is the new Live Events feature launched on August 14 for content creators in 20 countries

  • Australia
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • Canada
  • Czech Republic
  • France
  • Germany
  • Hungary
  • India
  • Italy
  • Mexico
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Singapore
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Ukraine
  • UK
  • United States
Fidji Simo (Vice President, Head of Facebook App
Fidji Simo Vice President, Head of Facebook App

Facebook App Manager Fidji Simo (Vice President, Head of Facebook App) says the feature was developed quickly to meet the needs of the public during the pandemic.

During the long and tiring months of lockdown, the online events hosted on the platform by Zuckerberg multiplied. From concerts to DJ sets, from tutorials to cooking and fitness courses.

An entire ecosystem that could now become a source of income for those who feed it with content. Let’s talk about live events, broadcast live. Events that doubled in the second quarter of 2020 compared to the same period of the previous year.

Twitch has also activated a similar feature, with the collaboration of SoundCloud to integrate musicians on their platform.

Soundcloud Launches Its Own Twitch Channel
Soundcloud Launches Its Own Twitch Channel

Musicians will then be able to create their own live streaming events using Facebook Live and ask participating users for a registration fee or “sell tickets” to attend the online events.

Musicians will then be able to create their own live streaming events using Facebook Live and ask participating users for a registration fee or "sell tickets" to attend the online events
Facebook Live Performing Musicians now can monetize their music on FB.

The event can be promoted online, like any live streaming event through its own page and all related tools. Facebook collects payments from contributors and hosts the event, paying the artist at the end of the event.

Some of the paid events that were held during the beta period include lectures, podcast recordings, cooking classes, meetings, and fitness classes.

But it soon becomes clear how musicians could use it as a tool to support themselves during the pandemic, but also afterward.

“With social distancing mandates still in place, many companies and creators are bringing their events and services online to connect with existing customers and reach new ones,” wrote Fidji Simo. “People also rely more on live video and interactive experiences when they can’t physically join.”

Facebook Live Events will not collect any fees from paid events for next year. This means that 100% of the proceeds (excluding the portion reserved for Apple) will go to the artists. Facebook made sure to highlight this fact on its blog.

“We asked Apple to reduce its App Store tax by 30% or allow us to offer Facebook Pay so that we can absorb all the costs for companies in trouble during COVID-19. Unfortunately, they rejected both of our claims and SMEs will only receive 70% of their hard-earned income. As this is complicated, as long as Facebook waives its commissions, we will clarify all commissions in our products” the blog post reads.

The screenshot shows that the iOS version of Facebook Live Events includes an additional disclaimer “Apple takes 30% of this purchase”. The message on Android says: “Facebook does not take a commission from this purchase”.

“Apple takes 30% of this purchase”

This is because Google has decided to give up 30% of the transactions.

While the new feature will definitely help musicians, it also puts pressure on Apple. This is yet another app that is impacted by the 30% fee.

Is Apple worth 30% of an iPhone user’s $ 9.99 donation to their favorite band?

When multiplied by millions of users, you immediately understand why the App Store fee needs to be revised.

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